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A bit disappointed that Hugh Laurie didn’t win an Emmy for his role in The Night Manager. Boo!

My co-author and business partner said she didn’t mind if I used some space on our server to host my blog, so I spent an evening last week reinstalling a backup copy of my blog to the new host. A couple of times I was ready to pull my hair out, but I find walking away and taking a break usually resolves the (human) error. I liked Blogger’s platform, but it broke all my permalinks, which cost me some traffic. Not that I get tons of traffic here, but a couple of my posts get a lot of hits because (I hope) they’re helpful, so there was that.

Last Saturday I drove down to Connecticut with my son for a family meeting. My stepmom’s best friend from high school was there, and she let us pick one of these pot-holders made from felted sweaters. I thought they were so cute and clever. (I picked one of those teal birdies.)

K worked in theater costume design for years, so I’m excited that next month when I drive down to North Carolina for a business meeting I’ll be spending a night at K’s house in Baltimore, which is roughly half-way between Boston and Research Triangle. I’d been agonizing whether or not to make the 12-hour drive in one straight shot, but when K invited me to spend the night at her house–quilts, sewing, fiber arts–no way was I going to turn that down. It’s nice because the part of the trip I was dreading has turned out to be something I’m looking forward to. I don’t really have any friends who are as into sewing and knitting as I am. They appreciate it, but they don’t want to talk about it to the degree I do.

Warm and rainy here today. Beautiful sunset in the evening as we drove back from Lexington. O wouldn’t let me pull over to take a picture. It kind of looked like this:

Hydrangea season

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I told my dentist last week that I see hearts everywhere. 🙂

The hydrangeas in the front of the house are spectacular this year, such a vibrant blue. Two years ago I had cut them back too severely so that last summer we only got a couple blooms.

I have not heard a peep (i.e. received any mail) from O since we dropped him off at camp. He had told me not to expect anything because he doesn’t like handwriting letters (the camp doesn’t allow computers/e-mail), but his counselor assured me I’d get a couple letters anyway. I’m trying not to get antsy about it … as long as he’s having a good time, that’s all that really matters. Plus the camp does a great job updating their blog every night to let parents know what’s going on. I can tell from the activities they describe that O is most definitely enjoying himself. He’s not super athletic but he’s “sporty” and loves to run around and participate in physical activities/games. They had a “marathon” the other night where kids could run a course through the woods, and I can guarantee he was ALL over that.

I’m picking him up this Saturday. I can’t wait to see him and hear all about his adventures!

Crafting

Melody and I are becoming fast friends, maybe even BFFs! Last week I took one of those “get to know your new sewing machine” classes at the dealership where I bought her. A lot of the class was fairly basic–how to thread the machine, how to wind a bobbin, etc.–but I did learn a few tricks and became comfortable with some of the advanced functions on the machine. Like buttonholes…as I said to my husband last night, I will never get sick of watching Melody sew a buttonhole!!! What used to be an exercise in frustration is now a matter of letting her do 90% of the job…my only task is to move the fabric around and press buttons. It couldn’t be easier.

Kwik Sew 3421Kwik Sew 3421

This week I finished the Roman shade for the dormer window in our bedroom and a pair of swimming trunks (Kwik Sew 3421) for my husband. I’ll talk about the Roman shades in my next post as I need to take photos. Both were straightforward projects, except for sewing the power mesh lining on the trunks. So slippery and fiddly and tricky to work with, especially when joining elastic around the leg holes. Luckily that part of the suit isn’t public. I used a medium-weight cotton twill I bought on sale at JoAnn’s for the outer fabric; my husband does not like synthetics, so cotton it is. Today’s job is to purchase a navy cotton drawstring to finish them off. The pattern, like all Kwik Sew patterns, is easy to follow. The only thing I would do differently is use my own way of inserting elastic in the waistband casing (sewing up the casing except for a 2″ gap, threading the elastic through as one long piece, sewing the ends, then sewing up the gap). The KS way is to sew the elastic into a circle then wrap the casing around it to sew it into place. Too fiddly for me!

Now it’s time for some selfish sewing. Today’s project is preparing fabric (lavender twill) for a my own pair of shorts.

I’m just over 80% done on the Pebble Beach shawl, which should be finished over the weekend at the rate I’m going. Each row is over 400 stitches long, and there’s a picot bind-off.

At last week’s knitting group I got my yarn to knit a 12″ x 12″ block for a blanket we’re making for an ailing group member. We get our choice of stitch patterns and I’m pretty happy with the one I chose. As soon as the block looks like a block, I’ll snap a photo. My goal is to have the block complete by next Thursday’s meeting.

Sequence Knitting got an excellent review at Knitter’s Review. Now I am tempted by Susan Crawford’s vintage Shetland knitting project/book, which is being crowdfunded. She has reached her goal, but is still accepting funding. I could have the book in my hands before the holidays, but honestly, will I really get around to knitting Fair Isle before then? I don’t think so.

I missed our Forrest family reunion and my Aunt Pam’s interment up in Vermont this weekend–my back was giving me trouble, then the car started making funny noises–but I did get to talk to my cousin Sherry at some length Saturday night. She said she sent an enormous amount of Aunt Pam’s yarn home with my father for me to have. Wow, I was so touched! I’ll probably pick it up on Saturday when I get O from camp…she says there’s a lot of it, so maybe I’ll have to make two trips. My Aunt Pam was a spectacular craftswoman; not only a first-rate knitter, but she painted, did cross-stitch and crewel embroidery, and quilted … and other crafts/art endeavors, I’m sure! At some point I will show you some of the projects she did. They are truly beautiful.

 

This sock climbed Mt. Washington

The sock that climbed Mt. Washington

This is the sock that climbed Mt. Washington on Saturday.

Literally.

What happened is that my foot got stuck between two rocks halfway between the Lake of the Clouds hut and the summit and when I pulled up, the outer sole of the hiking boot tore away, leaving only the inner sole. After a couple hundred feet in misty, slippery conditions, the inner sole fell away, exposing my (handknit) wool socks. Then my second boot started losing its outer sole, but luckily it stayed/flopped on for the rest of the hike.

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Amazingly, the socks came home no worse for the wear. They’ll probably be a little dirt stained, but no holes! My knitting has finally impressed my two boys.  🙂

Hiking Mt. Washington (6,289 feet or 1,917 meters) was … an experience. Had I known the trail we were taking was basically an uphill rock scramble most of the way, I would have backed out. At one point I fell pretty hard on my bum hip, but as of today, I haven’t felt any twinges of back pain. On the other hand, I’m kind of proud I made it to the top, even though I was the slowest, dead-last person in our group. (DH stayed behind with me because I was That Slow. He was my rock!) We never got cold, we had no serious injuries, and even though the wind was gusting 50 to 70 mph near the summit, it didn’t bother us too much. Another high point was witnessing O fall in love with hiking. He was like a mountain goat! Not only did he keep up with the group, a group I might add that was amazingly fit and experienced, he climbed down the mountain with them! (DH and I were too late, and with my wrecked boot(s) in no condition to hike down so we took the cog rail).

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Now all O is talking about is what mountain we can climb next summer. Uh-oh. I told DH never again would I do something as crazy as hike Mt. Washington, but after a couple days, I thought, “I should try it again, but next time be better prepared and in better shape.” I learned a lot about myself climbing that “hill,” so in retrospect it was a good experience.

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I just don’t want to experience it quite like that again!

TGIJ!

And yes! Spring is finally here in New England. 🙂 Some years I can start my garden in early May, but it was fairly cold here right up until Memorial Day. This week the temps are in the 70s and 80s, so maybe we’ll just go straight into summer … which is okay with me.

I decided a few weeks ago not to do a big garden this year. The biggest reason is my back, but since I’m planning to spend a lot of time in Connecticut this summer helping my parents out, having a garden adds more to-do items to my list. Instead, I asked O what he would really like to grow this year, and he said, “Watermelon!” Thus fully half of the fenced-in garden is dedicated to watermelon. I put in a few herbs (lavender, basil, rosemary), and then built a raised garden:

Raised garden bed

I basically followed the instructions I found on The Crafty Gemini (video was especially helpful). My husband let me borrow his electric power drill, and once I got the hang of drilling holes and screwing in the deck screws, putting the bed together was a piece of cake. The only difficult part of the operation was buying wood at Home Depot, where I was ignored and then talked down to, I suspect because of my chromosomal makeup. Time to look for a new place to buy lumber! Also, I want my own power drill. 🙂

This week O has been helping me fill this sucker with dirt and topsoil. I had hoped to get the soil to the top of the bed, but I think it’s good enough to grow kale and lettuce. Next summer I’m going to build a couple more beds using some scrap lumber.

Knitting

I finished my Mind the Gap socks a couple weeks ago. Nothing much to say about the pattern (btw, when does a pattern become your pattern? I’ve knit these plain vanilla socks so many times with a few personal tweaks that I don’t even need instructions.) The yarn was a pleasure to work with. I bought it through Trailing Cloud’s Etsy shop, thanks to Kristie’s post some months ago. I’m pleased I got the stripes to match on both socks, although I ran into orange striping while “kitchenering” one sock.

Mind the Gap socks

I had started on a plain vanilla cardigan last month, but today decided to rip it out and use the Cascade 220 yarn to knit Andi Satterlund’s Miette cardigan. I need more stylish sweaters, and Miette fits the bill. I also ordered some yarn through WEBS to knit another Kate Davies’ owl sweater for the fall and two skeins of hemp yarn for summer kerchiefs.

Weight

My weight did not budge in May despite my working out at the gym and zealously watching my food intake. That said, my pants are definitely getting looser. A couple weeks ago I bought a pair of size 8 jeans, which I thought I’d be able to fit into by the end of June. Well, I ended up fitting into them this weekend and wore them comfortably all day in Newport! So what I think is happening is that I’m burning fat and gaining muscle, which doesn’t change the number on the scale (muscle weighs more than fat) but muscle takes less room that fat, thus why I seem to feel smaller.

At any rate, I’m still heavier than I’d like to be — my body still has visible pockets of fat — so I’ve made some tweaks to my diet, instituted some new habits (drinking plenty of water!), and set a few goals for the month. Stay tuned …

Saying goodbye

My brother Matt finished out his year at the International Yacht Restoration School in Newport, RI, and is presently driving out west to Oregon to fight fires with the forest service. Here are some pictures of last weekend’s boat launch ceremony. Yes, that’s my crazy brother swimming in 58 degree water, towing his sailboat into harbor. Such a show off!

There was a woman next to us proclaiming loudly that people die jumping in the water like that. Not this guy!

John and Matt, IYRS, May 31, 2014

Matt is talking to John, who bought “Matt’s boat.” The sailboat will be moored at a local yacht club to be used by John’s children and grandchildren.

IYRS student boat launch, May 31, 2014

I loved the look of concentration on Matt’s face. He’s an excellent sailor!

What to sew, what to sew…

Like I mentioned last week, I started knitting up a second wool sock for a pair I’ve earmarked for my stepmother. That small act gave me a boost of knitting mojo. I’ve knitted about four inches of the cuff/leg, and with steady progress the socks should be ready for when we see her over spring vacation in two weeks.

My sewing mojo, on the other hand, has not only left the room, but it seems to have high-tailed it out of Dodge!

It’s not for lack of patterns, fabric, or ideas–I’ve got plenty of all three. What’s tripping me up is–and I’m ashamed to say this because I detest any whiff of body shame–my weight.

Last October I ended up in the hospital with a herniated disc, followed by DVT, with both conditions curtailing my cycling routine. Cycling is my exercise of choice, and it does a good job burning calories and keeping me fit. Not only was riding out, but walking was, too, because of all the ice and snow. (I had to be careful of falls or I could “bleed out.”) As a result, I put on 25 pounds through lack of exercise and not watching my eating when my activity levels dropped.

Now…I’m completely confident that those pounds will come off now that spring is here, my disc injury has healed, the DVT is gone, and I have an awesome trike to cycle with. But I keep thinking, “Do I want to cut into this gorgeous shirting/Japanese selvedge denim/expensive wool boucle for a Grainline Archer/pair of jeans/couture fringed skirt when in six months I’m going to be three sizes smaller?” Yes, I could alter the fit at some point, but to be honest, I don’t like doing alterations, especially on anything I’ve made. Is that weird? I don’t mind hemming Levi’s or taking in the sides of a RTW blouse, but when it’s my own creation, it somehow annoys me and the garment never again looks as good as it did during the original fitting. It looks, I don’t know, wonky.

The mature and rational side of my brain says, “Sew for the body you have today. Use the expensive fabric; you can always buy more. Test out that pattern you love. There’s no guarantee that when you lose the weight, you’re going to get a perfect garment anyway. And if you do love what you create for the ‘bigger me,’ you can ask a professional to alter it.” (Geez, listen to me. I should listen to myself more often!)

But then Lazy Easy-Way-Out Di chimes in: “Why not sew a bunch of knit things to wear around the house? like t-shirts and yoga pants? That’s how you dress anyway.” Princess Di calmly interjects with, “Dahling, I thought you were trying to upgrade your wardrobe and not continue down the path of fashion dereliction? Yoga pants,” she sniffs. “Really.”

So I do nothing but pet my fabrics and gaze longingly into my sewing room.

What would you do?

In the meantime, here are some more pretty pictures of Newport. Last weekend I took another trip down there, this time with my son, and we were able to see the boat my brother is building at IRYS up close.

Matt's boat

Lemur!

See the lemur?

Steam box

Curved pieces of wood get shaped in the steam box.

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The view from Brenton Point State Park

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My boy.

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The surf was crazy wild that day!

The fallout

We got about 6.5″ of snow yesterday–light, powdery stuff, the kind of snow that makes me twitchy for skiing. Unfortunately my skiing days are over (bad knees, sketchy back) unless the resort has long, gentle runs down the sides of the mountain as they do out west–I’m thinking Vail and Beaver Creek in Colorado. If I ever get the chance to visit Banff, however, this Vermont girl will throw caution to the wind to experience one last glorious run. One recurring dream I have is a happy one: I’m skiing down a mountain from the very top, and I’m doing jumps, moguls, and sharp turns effortlessly. The dream is always so thrilling I’m a bit sad to wake up and creak out of bed in the morning.

Speaking of creaking: tonight I have my second outpatient physical therapy appointment in Concord. Monday night I had my initial evaluation and the PT seemed impressed by my recovery. When he asked me to bend at the waist and try to touch the floor with my fingers, I surprised him by getting my palms flat on the floor without bending my knees. “Gymnastics team in junior high,” I explained. Which explained to him why my lower back has such a pronounced curve. He told me a lot of former gymnasts have this problem. The goal for these visits is to help me build my “core” to support my weakened spine.

Last night’s snowstorm had my husband coming home after midnight. The commute out of Boston/Cambridge earlier in the evening was longer than two hours for some people, so he decided to wait it out. The 35-minute drive home took him about an hour, which wasn’t so bad, but today he’s working at home.

Which leads me to a question: do any of you have spouses who wait until a car craps out before taking it to the garage for fixing? My husband does this and it. Drives. Me. NUTS. For months, now, he’s had this noise coming from the rear wheel wells. I asked him about it and suggested he take it in to our mechanic, but he insisted the problem wasn’t a major one … it was just a piece of metal flashing that would be expensive to remove and not fixing it wouldn’t hurt the car. The noise has gotten louder and louder, so I’ve kept at him. (“Maybe you should bring it over today since you’re working at home–I really think you have a brake problem,” says I, multiple times. “No,” says he, multiple times, “It’s nothing.”) It got to the point where when I had to drive to Connecticut for family stuff, I refused to take his car and rented one instead because I knew the problem was more than a loose piece of metal flashing.

Sure enough, when I woke up this morning he said the brake indicator lights had started flashing during his ride home  (meaning the car should not be driven at all!) so that’s why he was staying at home today. Yes, I rolled my eyes because if he had taken the car in months ago like I asked him to do, the fix would probably be a lot less money than it will be now.

I used to have a wonderful mechanic who worked on my Volvo and we would always get to talking about this and that when I brought my car in. He always loved working on my car because I took such good care of it. (214,000 miles until an au pair totaled it, grrr.) He told me that his female customers were much better at getting problems checked out and keeping up with regular maintenance than men were. He said my husband was his typical male customer. Interesting! So I’m off to rent a car later this afternoon. At least I’ll have wheels for a few days.

O has a short day today, and with DH home I won’t get as much done as I’d hoped to. My co-author Linda and I are writing a new book, which I’m very excited about. It’s called The Introverted Entrepreneur, about how introverts can develop, grow, and promote an online presence without crushing their souls. Both Linda and I are major introverts; I’m an INFP in Myers-Briggs parlance and off-the-charts introverted according to other psychological tests I’ve taken. We were talking about it and noted that we’ve succeeded by doing things our way, so we figured, Hey, there’s probably a lot of introverts out there like us who would like to know how we built our brand despite our hermit-like proclivities. Let’s write a book!

If you are an introvert and have an online presence (blogging, Etsy store, Internet marketing site), please contact me. I’d love to interview you for the book. 🙂

Tomorrow I plan to have some knitting to show off.

 

What a week

Fiat 500

City Fish Market, Wethersfield

Remnants of fall in spring puddle

O and Carolina

O and Carolina

O and I spent his spring break down in Connecticut with my parents … a couple days at my father’s house on the lake, then a day at my mother’s house in Mystic.

We were lucky and got a Fiat 500 from the rental car company. I was so excited to get it. And yes, it lived up to my expectations. Not only adorable, but peppy and surprisingly comfortable. Usually after an hour of driving, I have to get out and stretch my spine … not so with this car. I was sad to bring it back to the rental company at the week’s end. 🙁 Fingers crossed I can buy one when my car-less in suburbia experiment ends in October.

On Monday the 15th I left O with my parents and drove up to Northampton, home to my alma mater, Smith College, but more importantly, home to the yarn Mecca called WEBS, which was having its anniversary sale. I spent several hours there, bummed that the wool I’d picked out for two projects was backordered, but I did find enough for other projects in the queue. Thanks to my parents for the generous Christmas gift that financed this expedition! 🙂

On the way back to Connecticut, I stopped at another favorite place, City Fish Market in Wethersfield to pick up some salmon for dinner. I love this place. My mom used to buy fish here when we were kids, so it’s always a nice nostalgic visit.

When I got back to my father’s house, I recall asking him who won the Boston Marathon. My father is a former marathoner who has actually run this marathon, but he didn’t know. I went to work preparing dinner, then went to check my e-mail when I saw a couple “Are you okay?” e-mails. Panic rising, I checked the news and saw what had happened. I quickly called my husband, who works in Cambridge, and he assured me he was fine. The rest of the night we stayed glued to the television.

We cut our visit to Connecticut a little short so we could return to Boston. It’s weird, but I just wanted to be home even though it felt like everything was crazy up there. We did sneak in a visit to Storrs to the UCONN Dairy Bar, got in a nice walk at Center Church Camp, and my mother treated me to the first whole belly clams of the season down at Sea Swirl in Mystic. (Sorry, North Shore folks but Sea Swirl clams are superior, nyah-nyah.)

My husband usually works late on Thursday nights, but he came home a bit early because we’d returned. I was beat from all the drama of the week so I went to bed super-early and when I woke at 7, my husband had already left for work. He works at 500 Technology Square, which is part of MIT bordering the east campus. The first thing I do when I wake is check my e-mail … and oh no, a bunch more e-mails asking if we’re okay, or specifically if my husband is okay because of what happened at MIT!!! Frantically I checked the news, then called my husband. He happened to get into work so early that he was able to get into his building before they locked down Cambridge, but the fatal shooting and carjacking the night before had happened within a block of his building. I was so grateful that he’d come home early the night before because he would have been in the thick of it otherwise!

I had some worry that he wouldn’t be able to get home that night, but with the action firmly over in Watertown, he was able to leave work around noon and return home.

And that was that.

I can’t bear to watch the news anymore. It disgusts me that such a fun, iconic event like the Boston Marathon was attacked like this. But the pundits and comedians all have it right: Boston is a tough city. I mean come on … we stuck by the Red Sox for how long? The people who live here are resilient. My heart goes out to the families who lost loved ones who were too young to pass. The people who were hurt and maimed will be loved and supported by not just their families, but the whole community.

 

 

 

Fidelity Issues

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I’ve been working on this sweater since December, and while I do enjoy the knitting, especially now that I know how to do cables without a cable hook, all I do is fantasize about other projects. Yes, I’m having some big-time fidelity issues with this sweater. I want to start up something new, something exciting! But I feel like I’ve made a promise to this sweater, to get it done by St. Patrick’s Day, which I, uh, obviously did not honor. Now my goal is April …ish. And I don’t want to get distracted by some other pretty project, which will keep me from making slow and steady project on my cardigan. So I spend my evenings lusting at pattern porn on Ravelry and thinking, “Someday, Di. Someday.”

What’s left: I’m just starting decreases for the sleeve cap on my second sleeve (got there last night at Knit Night … hi S if you’re reading this!) Then I just have the two front cardigan panels, button bands, neck band, and seaming. I’m feeling more confident about seaming now that I’ve found some good YouTube videos on seaming moss stitch. Really, the only tricky part left is the picking up of stitches for the button bands and neck band.

So yes, that photo above … I showed this to S last night and I’m tiny bit concerned. The yarn is all from the same dye lot, but there’s definitely a color difference between the sleeves and the back panel. The sleeves are much more yellowish. Here’s why I’m trying not to freak. The back panel has already been blocked; the sleeves haven’t. If there was something wonky with one of the skeins, it would have showed up in the back panel because I used nearly two skeins of yarn there and you can’t tell where one skein ends and the other begins. So I’m hoping when I block the rest of the pieces, the yellowish tint of the yarn will wash away. Fingers crossed.

Playing nursemaid

Purry

Thanksgiving morning O woke up feeling terrible. Not surprising since DH had been sick with a severe cold for over a week. So we ended up staying home for the day instead of having dinner down in Connecticut with my family. The good news? None of us are huge fans of Thanksgiving food so the disappointment on the food front was minimal. O felt better that evening so we drove down to my father’s house and spent the rest of the weekend there — taking long walks with my brother’s Golden Retriever, watching Animal Planet, and I, of course, got a lot of knitting done, as well as discovered a lovely yarn shop not ten minutes away. The cat in the picture above is Purry, my father’s lab cat; my father is a cat-loving chemist. My father let O name her when she was a kitten and it’s a credit to his good natured attitude as a grandfather that he didn’t argue about the name. Purry is a lovely affectionate lap cat, which was such a pleasure for me as our own two cats will only bear the occasional ear rub. Purry’s only character flaw is an aggressive nature around yarn while it’s being knit. Grrr.

When we returned to Boston on Sunday, DH was no better and then O started feeling crummy again. Both of them have this dry cough that gets worse at night. O ended up missing three days of school this week, and — yahoo! — today he returned. He seemed pretty happy when I dropped him off this morning for his student council meeting; I think he misses his friends.

I haven’t gotten much work done while playing nursemaid … certainly no time to blog. When O was cuddled up on the couch, he asked if I’d sit next to him and knit. Now how can I refuse a request like this. I ended up finishing a pair of cozy wool socks and starting the pair of Norwegian stockings from Nancy Bush’s Folk Socks. I’m about 1/3 of the way down the leg; the stocking looks huge! But I tried it on and it’s snug around my calf so … I guess it’s because I remember buying argyle knee socks when I was in high school and weighed about 110 lbs. Those 80s socks were certainly smaller!

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I have some more finished objects to show you, and if O cooperates, I hope to have them modeled and photographed later this afternoon.

The Gentle Art of Knitting

When I heard/read that Jane Brocket was coming out with a knitting book, I got pretty excited. The Gentle Art of Domesticity keeps a prominent place on my livingroom bookshelf and gives me that boost I need when the house needs a little TLC.

The Gentle Art of Knitting was released in England a few months ago. I considered buying it sight unseen, but then I read some negative reader reviews of it and scratched it off my list. The complaints were that the knitting projects were too basic and not very revolutionary. (Those are my words/impressions of the reviews.) I buy very few knitting books, and only buy them for reference .

Though I’d resolved not to buy the book, I was thrilled to find a copy of it at our local library on the new titles shelf.

I spent a pleasant hour or two reading through it, sipping tea, during one of the many drenching rain storms of May. Is there anything revolutionary in the book? Why, yes, there is. As the reader reviewers noted, there aren’t any patterns in here that will put Brooklyn Tweed out of business anytime soon, but what Brocket’s book does brilliantly is remind knitters to focus on the process, not the product. As someone who frequently gets impatient to finish a sweater or can’t wait to start some complicated cabled shawl, I appreciate this message. As soon as I put the book down, I cast on 37 stitches of red cotton and knit a simple garter stitch dishcloth. Then, I knit another, this time striping at random places with blue cotton.

It’s the kind of knitting book I like to have when my handwork is giving me fits and I need to be reminded why I knit … to create beautiful objects with care, to bond with friends (who knit), and to relax and enjoy the hours rather than wasting them idly in front of the computer or television set.

I do think I’ll be getting a copy for my own bookshelf. The library’s version was from England. Unlike British cookbooks, I like British knitting books to be “Americanized” with our needle sizes and dimensions in inches rather than centimeters, so I’m hoping they’ll come out with a Yank version soon.

While on the domestic subject, I was futzing around the Web yesterday and found this video about how to properly fold a t-shirt, hosted by none other than Anthea Turner:

When I wasn’t ironing and folding my extensive t-shirt collection, I was watching the Jubilee procession on the Thames, broadcast over CNN. My goodness, the British must be thrilled to have Piers Morgan off their island. The man DOES NOT SHUT UP. He interrupted every guest, including India Hicks, who was attempting to tell the audience what it was like to be in Princess Diana’s wedding party. Morgan kept butting in with his own memories of the day, none of which were as remotely exciting as being Princess Diana’s bridesmaid. I wanted to throttle him. So I ended up turning the tv off, and downed a glass of lemon barley water in honor of the Queen.

And how was your Jubilee weekend?